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I'd like to know whether there's some kind of database offering the logic or mathematical equivalent of English expressions, for example the conjunction "whereas", which has at least two meanings, each meaning in turn having several synonyms.

So far, I've only found the three pages below

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mathematical_symbols https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_logic_symbols

https://unicode-table.com/en/

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    $\begingroup$ "whereas" so for as I can tell means "and". Basically, math logic is only concerned with whether things are true or not. English, "but" "whereas" "however" "as well" etc. express expectation and cognitive association and other things that are completely irrelevant to the math concern of whether a thing is true or not. $\endgroup$ – fleablood Nov 16 '17 at 20:12
  • $\begingroup$ @fleablood I sometimes like to think about ways to interpret 'natural language' in logical systems [mostly because I get frustrated with ambiguous statements that I encounter] and, to a point, you can actually construct meaningful logical systems that encapsulate some of the ambiguity of natural language but, as far as I know, there isn't any accepted standard and, so far, all my attempts ran into issues where their interpretation of a certain statement disagreed with the 'accepted one' - even in simple cases. $\endgroup$ – Stefan Mesken Nov 16 '17 at 21:51

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