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Suppose you are given a circle and find that the points (-2,1) (3,2) and (2,4) lie on the circle. Where is the center of the circle and what is its radius? What is the equation that describes this circle?

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closed as off-topic by mechanodroid, José Carlos Santos, Hans Lundmark, Claude Leibovici, Arnaud D. Nov 14 '17 at 11:02

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question is missing context or other details: Please improve the question by providing additional context, which ideally includes your thoughts on the problem and any attempts you have made to solve it. This information helps others identify where you have difficulties and helps them write answers appropriate to your experience level." – mechanodroid, José Carlos Santos, Hans Lundmark, Claude Leibovici, Arnaud D.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    $\begingroup$ One thing you could do is write a useful title. Everybody who posts here needs help and has little idea what to do. Title your question so it is easier to figure out what kind of question it is. $\endgroup$ – Thomas Andrews Nov 14 '17 at 6:44
  • $\begingroup$ Begging for help, and putting it all in caps in the title will not get you an answer more quickly. $\endgroup$ – Remy Nov 14 '17 at 6:47
  • $\begingroup$ Since the line segments joining the points will be chords of the circle, the perpendicular bisectors of those line segments will intersect in the centre. $\endgroup$ – Mark Bennet Nov 14 '17 at 8:00
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The equation of a circle is $$(x-a)^2 + (y-b)^2 = r^2$$ You have three points, you should be able to calculate the constants.

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