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I'm looking for a book about mathematics, but not about calculus, algebra or any field of math. I want to read a book about the use of mathematics in the world, for example, Why is math so useful. Or maybe something about the point of view of a mathematician in the world or even a biographyy of someone math related. Any book related to math (but not with the theorems/definitions/integrals/etc) I will take in consideration. Thanks

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closed as too broad by Simply Beautiful Art, Namaste, J. M. is a poor mathematician, Did, Matthew Towers Nov 6 '17 at 10:45

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ What Is Mathematics? An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods 2nd Edition by Richard Courant (Author),‎ Herbert Robbins (Author),‎ Ian Stewart (Editor) $\endgroup$ – Moo Nov 5 '17 at 17:03
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    $\begingroup$ No book recommendation, but a hint: Mathematics is the science of structure. And since there is structure everywhere you look, mathematics is everywhere and thus very useful. $\endgroup$ – amsmath Nov 5 '17 at 17:17
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    $\begingroup$ I think it would be helpful to pin down a bit more regarding th criteria, otherwise the question strikes me as too broad, perhaps it can be a big list, or community wiki? A two sentence answer half of which is the citation of a book (no different than a link only answer) should be open for deletion, @Warlock. $\endgroup$ – Namaste Nov 6 '17 at 1:08
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    $\begingroup$ While not a book recommendation, I'd like to suggest watching all of George Paul Csicsery's films at zalafilms.com. Hard Problems is a good place to start. $\endgroup$ – user435237 Nov 6 '17 at 4:22
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    $\begingroup$ Why is this question already closed for answers? The existing answers do not even give a close approximation to the choice of books which are available. $\endgroup$ – Martin Peters Nov 6 '17 at 10:56
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"A Mathematician's Apology" by G.H. Hardy can be a good starting point. It is a classic from the '40, also written by an incredible Mathematician.

Disclaimer

This as to be intended as an answer to the questions " book about the use of mathematics in the world", "something about the point of view of a mathematician" and "biography". It certainly addresses also the topic of the usefulness of Mathematics to the human society but, the author instead of providing arguments to prove that Mathematics is "so useful" will try to show that the true and beautiful Mathematics is useless to the society. This has to be intended in a good way since Hardy, who was a pacifist, wanted to take distances from the possible (negative) applications of Mathematics to war.

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    $\begingroup$ To recomment Hardy "about the use of mathematics in the world" is rather ironic (not sure GHH himself would have agreed to see his name mentioned here). $\endgroup$ – Did Nov 6 '17 at 8:05
  • $\begingroup$ Well, for sure he speaks about the usefulness, applications and beauty of the mathematics, and that's the point. The particular position he had on this topic is not relevant. $\endgroup$ – Warlock of Firetop Mountain Nov 6 '17 at 8:40
  • $\begingroup$ If the particular position in question is that the essence of mathematics is to have no use in the world, then, sorry but this seems quite relevant. $\endgroup$ – Did Nov 6 '17 at 9:39
  • $\begingroup$ The answer still fits almost all the requisites of the question: "book about the use of mathematics in the world", "Or maybe something about the point of view of a mathematician in the world" or "even a biography of someone math related". The only thing partially not addressed is "why is math so useful". $\endgroup$ – Warlock of Firetop Mountain Nov 6 '17 at 9:48
  • $\begingroup$ Your "defense" of this answer is touching. $\endgroup$ – Did Nov 6 '17 at 10:14
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A good idea-since you are after all a Maths student-would be "Mathematics Made Difficult" by Carl E. Linderholm.

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    $\begingroup$ Lol, I like the title! $\endgroup$ – amsmath Nov 5 '17 at 17:18
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Then what about start and reading about the historical development of math ?
For instance I found very interesting A History of Mathematics-Carl B. Boyer.

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Currently I am reading How Not To Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking (Amazon Link). That sounds like what you are looking for, and so far I'm quite enjoying it.

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One of my favorites is Beyond Numeracy bu John Allen Paulos (1991). It's written "magazine style," with about 60 short essays describing various mathematical subjects and why they are important. Some of the essays are of an theoretical nature, but many do describe examples or real world use and why math is so useful. From the book flap:

"...presents in engrossing fashion a broad range of mathematical concepts, from the basic to the advanced, that have transformed our civilization."

I read it my very first semester in college. I didn't understand everything in it. But it is very accessible.

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"What is mathematics, really?", by Reuben Hersh. From the blurb:

In what sense do mathematical objects exist? How can we have knowledge of them? Why do mathematicians think mathematical entities exist for ever, independent of human knowledge?

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On "Why is math so useful?", this is a question that's been discussed in recent years by philosophers of science and philosophers of math. Mark Colyvan's An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mathematics includes a bit of dicussion of this subject, and should have pointers to others' work on the topic. Mathematically, the book seems quite accessible to someone who's already quite comfortable with math. It is definitely introductory with respect to philosophy (of math), but philosophical thinking about something like math can seem foreign at first to some people.

To give you some context to how I'm interpreting your question, in a very informal way: Sometimes mathematical entities--numbers, sets, structures, etc.--seem to live in a realm of their own. Some mathematicians and philosophers think about math this way. Yet math seems to be essential to the ways that science learns about physical world. These two perspectives seem to conflict, so some adjustment to thinking about math and science seems necessary. There are different ways to do this.

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