0
$\begingroup$

Is there any way I can get this into the form of a separable, Bernoulli, exact, or any other form of differential equation that is easy to solve?

Solve the following differential equation:

$$\frac{(ydx+xdy)}{(1-x^2y^2)}+xdx=0$$

can someone show me the procedure to simplify or convert this differential equation into a form that is easy to solve?

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Hint: $$ydx+xdy=d(xy)$$ $\endgroup$ – lab bhattacharjee Oct 5 '17 at 16:11
  • $\begingroup$ @empty Just learn to solve problem yourself! $\endgroup$ – Nosrati Oct 5 '17 at 18:02
1
$\begingroup$

Hint:

Let $xy=u$ and solve $$\int\dfrac{du}{1-u^2}=-\int xdx$$

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

$\dfrac{\mathrm d(xy}{1-(xy)^2}+x\mathrm dx=0 \\ \dfrac{1}{2} \ln \dfrac{1+xy}{1-xy}+\dfrac{x^2}{2} = c, \space some \space constant$

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.