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It might seems that my question has already been asked, but in fact it's slightly different from the other similar question, so please read it.

I'm in the middle of my last university year in a pure mathematics program, specifically designed to prepare students to do a PhD. The problem is: I'm not so sure that I want to do a PhD, and I'm starting to look for some alternatives. Googling and reading things around I reached the conclusion that for someone with a hyper pure mathematics background is really hard to find a job that allow him to apply this knowledge directly (I'll love to, but hey, not a big deal otherwise), but nevertheless there are a lot of companies looking for people with high problem solving skills, and a degree in pure mathematics is a good way to demonstrate to have them.

My question is: where can I find those job offers? As we aren't speaking of a particular field, company or industry I have no idea what I have to look into.

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closed as too broad by rschwieb, achille hui, Claude Leibovici, Namaste, José Carlos Santos Sep 30 '17 at 19:11

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Most job offers specify what they want people to be able to do. A list of programming languages, work methods, et.c. I think to work on being able to demonstrate that would be valuable if you have a lack of courses demonstrating you can do that. Showing that you have taken many math courses sure already proves you can grasp difficult concepts and probably attack difficult problems. So I would think a good priority would be to focus on learning how to show to people what you can do practically. $\endgroup$ – mathreadler Sep 29 '17 at 19:29
  • $\begingroup$ Also please dont be discouraged if your question is not well received. There are many moderators on here who want this forum to be about specific mathematics questions only. $\endgroup$ – mathreadler Sep 29 '17 at 19:31
  • $\begingroup$ Well, I asked that here because I found a lot of question with similar subject (and here is where I get the ideas I exposed in my post). If someone knows some more suitable site where to post this question I'll do it without any problem. $\endgroup$ – Davide F. Sep 29 '17 at 19:34
  • $\begingroup$ Speaking as one who has once worked in industry. What's taught in undergrad is not specific enough. For Bachelor degree, what discipline you get the degree doesn't really matter. If we want someone with problem solving skill, a master degree is preferable. My advice is look for a master degree in computer science or other applied discipline. At the least, take enough applied courses in final year and then advertise yourself as one who can be practical and theoretical at the same time. $\endgroup$ – achille hui Sep 29 '17 at 22:10
  • $\begingroup$ But I'm ending a master degree $\endgroup$ – Davide F. Sep 29 '17 at 22:16