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This is very simple but somehow I can't gather my head around it.

There are two groups, group A is 10 percent more likely to have certain characteristic, what proportion of population has that characteristic?

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I meant group as an english word. I know it's a stupid question but I'm just finding it hard to comprehend. Is the proportion of population which have certain characteristic (for example males) is going to be 55% in this case? To elaborate more, let's say that in a certain population it is likely that males are 10 percent more likely show up to the event than females. Then can I say that proportion of males who show up is 55%?

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  • $\begingroup$ I think the word group might be better replaced with set, as group has a mathematical meaning. also what has been tried ? what is the sticking point ? $\endgroup$
    – user451844
    Aug 2, 2017 at 2:17
  • $\begingroup$ I meant group as an english word. I know it's a stupid question but I'm just finding it hard to comprehend. Is the proportion of population which have certain characteristic (for example males) is going to be 55% in this case? To elaborate more, let's say that in a certain population it is likely that males are 10 percent more likely show up to the event than females. Then can I say that proportion of males who show up is 55%? $\endgroup$ Aug 2, 2017 at 2:32

2 Answers 2

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To elaborate more, let's say that in a certain population it is likely that males are 10 percent more likely show up to the event than females. Then can I say that proportion of males who show up is 55%?

No.

Let $x$ be the proportion of males expected to show up at the event and $1-x$ the proportion of females.   Interpreting "$10\%$ more likely" to mean $x=1.1(1-x)$.   Then we conclude $x=11/21$.

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As you've stated the question, there's not enough information to answer it.

What other information is available?

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