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What does the symbol $$/\therefore$$ mean in sentential logic?

I know that $\therefore$ denotes the conclusion of an argument. Does $/\therefore$ mean not follows?

Thanks in advance for any help!

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2 Answers 2

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It still means 'therefore'. Sometimes a line is drawn under the premises to signal the end of the premises and say 'and now comes the conclusion'. I suppose / $\therefore$ is a bit of a redundant way of combining those two signals.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for the clarification! $\endgroup$
    – C_M
    Commented Jul 27, 2017 at 14:35
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While writing a formal proof of validity in logic, a concise way is to list the premisses and the statements deduced from them in one column with justification written beside them. It is convenient to put the conclusion to the right of the last premiss, separated from it by a slanting line '/ ' which automatically marks all of the statements above it to be premisses.

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