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How can I solve this integral only with u-substitution? Is this possible?

$$\int \left (1+e^{at} \right )^{\frac{3}{2}}e^{-at}dt$$

I know how to evaluate this integral, my question is how can I obtain this primitive without partial fractions, just substitution. Thank you.

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  • $\begingroup$ partial fractions won't get you anywhere. So how did you evaluate the integral? $\endgroup$ – amWhy Jul 13 '17 at 1:05
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    $\begingroup$ Hint: This equals the Chebyshev Integral after $x=-e^{at}$. $\endgroup$ – Simply Beautiful Art Jul 13 '17 at 1:07
  • $\begingroup$ @amWhy I just did the substitution 1 + exp (at) = u and finished with partial fractions. $\endgroup$ – otreblig Jul 13 '17 at 1:20
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$$\int \left(e^{a t}+1\right)^{3/2} e^{-a t} \, dt$$ substitute $ e^{-a t} =u$ so that $-ae^{-a t} dt=du\rightarrow dt=\dfrac{du}{-au}$

The integral becomes $$-\frac{1}{a}\int \left(\frac{1}{u}+1\right)^{3/2} \, du$$

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Let $$ u = e^{at}, \qquad du = a e^{at} dt $$ Therefore $$ dt = \frac{1}{a u} du $$


$$ \int \left( 1 + e^{at} \right)^{\frac{3}{2}} e^{-at} dt \quad \Rightarrow \quad \int \frac{\left( 1 + e^{at} \right)^{\frac{3}{2}}}{a u^{2}} du $$

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