5
$\begingroup$

I am interested in a mathematical approach to quantum information theory. I have observed that several probabilists have been working in this area. What can be a suitable background and good book for this subject?

$\endgroup$
7
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Nielsen Chuang is a classsic -- not really a mathematical approach but in my opinion sufficiently stringent nonetheless $\endgroup$
    – Thomas
    Jul 2, 2017 at 14:03
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you! Could you kindly give an idea of what kind of problems mathematicians or probabilists are interested in this field? I think a lot has to do with Entropy von Neumann algebras. Would this book also give me a hint of these problems? $\endgroup$ Jul 2, 2017 at 14:10
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I don't think so. It's more a rather thourough introduction to the field with a focus on how quantum computers work, the 'classic' topics fourier transform and quantum search and then about quantum information in general. I was just writing down a thought, it may not be the direction you are interested in. $\endgroup$
    – Thomas
    Jul 2, 2017 at 15:34
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I have seen people using this one by Ohya, Masanori, Volovich, but I haven't read it myself, so I can't recommend it. You can still check it out :). $\endgroup$ Jul 11, 2017 at 7:21
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Besides Nielsen Chuang (very comprehensive), if your interest is towards quantum computer science I recommend the introduction of Mermin. In fact I suggest you to read this book even if you are not particularly interested in this direction because of the extraordinary clear approach of the author. Give it a try. $\endgroup$
    – Alessandro
    Jul 17, 2017 at 20:13

2 Answers 2

4
+50
$\begingroup$

I myself started learning quantum information theory with Quantum Computing by J. Gruska and Quantum Computation and Information Theory by Nielsen-Chuang. I think the former is more mathematical. It covers very well Hilbert spaces and related notions. I like very much the treatment of observalbles and measurements. On the other hand Nielsen-Chuang, I think, has a very good computational approach.

In overall, if you look for an $\textbf{introduction}$, it will be difficult to find a lot of abstract math. I work in mathematical aspects of quantum error correction and the books I mentioned worked well for the basics. Afterwards most of literature was articles and lecture notes.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

There's an excellent introductory book called "Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists" by Yanofski and Manucci. It goes through the theory of quantum computation and information using simple Hermetian matrices and tensor products as the mathematical language.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .