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How would you find the probability of selecting 1 red marble and 1 green marble or 1 yellow marble and 1 orange marble out of a bag of 12 marbles

There are four red marbles,one green marble, one yellow marble, six orange marbles

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closed as off-topic by Leucippus, Daniel W. Farlow, NCh, José Carlos Santos, JonMark Perry Jun 19 '17 at 7:01

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    $\begingroup$ how many of each type are in the bag?? $\endgroup$ – Saketh Malyala Jun 18 '17 at 22:09
  • $\begingroup$ @SakethMalyala I added amount of each type in edit $\endgroup$ – Math Skillz Jun 18 '17 at 23:34
  • $\begingroup$ Have you tried to solve this on your own? $\endgroup$ – Gerard L. Jun 18 '17 at 23:36
  • $\begingroup$ Yep I have tried $\endgroup$ – Math Skillz Jun 18 '17 at 23:42
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    $\begingroup$ Are we to assume that two marbles are selected without replacement? $\endgroup$ – N. F. Taussig Jun 18 '17 at 23:59
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In this answer I'm assuming that the asker means to find the probability of the cases combined, and that the order in which he listed the marbles is the order that they are picked:
The probability of picking a red marble is $4/12$. The probability of picking a green marble is $1/11$, since I'm assuming that the marbles are not replaced. You multiply since you want both of these occuring. $1/3$ times $1/11$ equals $1/33$.
Try to apply this logic to the orange and yellow marbles, then multiply the results.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for answering!!!!! $\endgroup$ – Math Skillz Jun 19 '17 at 1:30

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