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I read out

$$\frac{d}{dx}$$ as "d by d x".

How do I read out:

$$\frac{∂}{∂x}$$ then?

I saw this Wikipedia Page it said:

The symbol is referred to as "del" (not to be confused with ∇, also known as "del"), "dee", "partial dee", "partial" (especially in LaTeX), "round d", "curly dee", or "dabba".

So according to this, I should read it out as "del by del x". Is that correct? If not, how else?

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    $\begingroup$ IMO, $\nabla$ is better known as nabla (LaTeX \nabla). $\endgroup$
    – user65203
    Jun 14, 2017 at 14:06
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    $\begingroup$ Using "dee dee x" works for me. It's often clear from the context whether to interpret "dee" as $d$ or $\partial$. If not, I say "partial dee dee x". $\endgroup$
    – user254433
    Jun 14, 2017 at 14:08
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    $\begingroup$ I say (I say, I say) "Partial dee by dee ecks" $\endgroup$
    – user284001
    Jun 14, 2017 at 14:53
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    $\begingroup$ I have edited my answer... check it out... $\endgroup$
    – Soham
    Sep 6, 2017 at 18:35

2 Answers 2

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You can say $\displaystyle\frac{\partial y}{\partial x}$ as "Partial derivative of y wrt. x" or "del y by del x".

You can also read this introductory text on partial derivatives. enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Umm you mean "del y by del x" or am I wrong? $\endgroup$ Jun 14, 2017 at 14:16
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    $\begingroup$ @PrittBalagopal Yeah..typo there $\endgroup$
    – Soham
    Jun 14, 2017 at 14:33
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Partial derivative with respect to x

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  • $\begingroup$ Similarly, I would read $d\over dx$ as "derivative with respect to $x$" $\endgroup$
    – Χpẘ
    Jun 14, 2017 at 17:12

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