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Can someone please explain this to me, the part where we take the integrals, why is it not $ \frac{1}{ \Delta x^{2}} $ for K11 how do they get 2\deltax >? enter image description here

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The basis functions are supported on very small intervals, so while both of them contribute a $\frac{1}{\Delta x}$, the length of the interval is only $\Delta x$ so we end up with an interval on the order of $$\frac{1}{\Delta x^2} \Delta x = \frac{1}{\Delta x}$$

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  • $\begingroup$ so where di they 2 come from ? I am just learnig this method and am still very confused. $\endgroup$ – italy May 19 '17 at 19:56
  • $\begingroup$ You can explicitly do the integrals to see exactly where everything comes from. The actual support of each basis function has length $2\Delta x$ which is why there is a two. The support of adjacent functions overlap on intervals of length $\Delta x$. $\endgroup$ – User8128 May 19 '17 at 23:03
  • $\begingroup$ I see it now thank you $\endgroup$ – italy May 19 '17 at 23:36

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