2
$\begingroup$

I need to prove that

$\sum_{i-is-even}^n \binom{n}{i} = \sum_{i-is-odd}^n \binom{n}{i}$

i starts from 0.

I succeeded proving this for odd n. But how to prove it for even n's?

$\endgroup$
4
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Hint: Look at the binomial expansion of $(1+x)^n$ and consider $x=-1$ $\endgroup$
    – user12345
    Apr 20, 2017 at 16:48
  • $\begingroup$ Hint: Expand $\binom ni = \binom{n-1}{i-1} + \binom{n-1}i$. $\endgroup$
    – Arthur
    Apr 20, 2017 at 16:49
  • $\begingroup$ Your assertion can be rephrased as: $\sum_{k=0}^{n} (-1)^{k} \binom{n}{k} = 0$. See math.stackexchange.com/q/94514/215011 $\endgroup$
    – grand_chat
    Apr 20, 2017 at 17:16
  • $\begingroup$ If $n > 0$ !!!. $\endgroup$ Apr 24, 2017 at 2:10

1 Answer 1

1
$\begingroup$

We show equality by showing the difference of both sums is zero.

We obtain \begin{align*} \sum_{{i=0}\atop{i \text{ even}}}^n&\binom{n}{i}-\sum_{{i=0}\atop{i \text{ odd}}}^n\binom{n}{i}\\\ &=\sum_{{i=0}\atop{i \text{ even}}}^n\binom{n}{i}(-1)^i+\sum_{{i=0}\atop{i \text{ odd}}}^n\binom{n}{i}(-1)^i\tag{1}\\ &=\sum_{i=0}^n\binom{n}{i}(-1)^i\tag{2}\\ &=(1-1)^n\tag{3}\\ &=0 \end{align*} and the claim follows.

Comment:

  • In (1) we multiply the terms with $(-1)^i$, which is $1$ if $i$ is even and $-1$ if $i$ is odd. This is just a preparation to easily merge both sums.

  • In (2) we simplify the expression by adding both sums.

  • In (3) we apply the binomial theorem.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .