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In one of my junior classes, my Mathematics teacher, while teaching Mensuration, told us that metres square and square metres have a difference between them and metres cube and cubic metres too have a difference between them and that we should not mix them up. When i asked her the reason behind them being different, she told me that she would discuss about that later on but she forgot and i too forgot to remind her. Now i remember about all this. Why are they different and what is the difference between them. I have searched the internet but could not find anything valuable.

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    $\begingroup$ Your teacher is wrong. There is no difference in meaning. It's different notation for the same unit. $\endgroup$ Feb 17, 2017 at 15:09
  • $\begingroup$ @HansEngler, she said that they have a slight difference between them and that they are not exactly the same. $\endgroup$
    – MrAP
    Feb 17, 2017 at 15:11
  • $\begingroup$ Please ask her which is larger. $\endgroup$ Feb 17, 2017 at 19:21

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They have the same meaning.

What is sometimes confused is saying "four metres squared" versus "four square metres". The first is squaring the quantity four metres so you get an answer of $16m^2$ while the second is just a way of saying $4m^2$.

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  • $\begingroup$ I have edited my question. Please have a look at it. $\endgroup$
    – MrAP
    Mar 21, 2017 at 3:53
  • $\begingroup$ If you are still unsure what your teacher meant then please ask your teacher as I've answered to the best of my ability based off what you have said. $\endgroup$
    – Ian Miller
    Mar 23, 2017 at 14:09
  • $\begingroup$ You have answered my question. $\endgroup$
    – MrAP
    Mar 23, 2017 at 15:26
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"Square metre" means area, while "metre square" means a square having all sides 1 metre.

So, "8 square metres" is an area, while an "8-metre square" means a square of side 8 metres (and area 64 square metres).

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