3
$\begingroup$

I am a foreign student preparing for UK exams in maths and am confused by number formats I should use.

(1) While studying the US, my teacher sometimes considered my number $1$ to be $7$ as I wrote a diagonal line, which is not normally used in the US (see the image). How are these digits, as well as $4$, normally written in the UK?

(2) In my language, we never say and in long numbers, which is opposite in English. If $1,234,567$ is pronounced as 'one million, two hundred and thirty-four thousand, five hundred and sixty-seven' (i.e. 'and' is not used between units and thousands, thousands and millions, etc.), how to pronounce long numbers containing zeros correctly, e.g.:

  • $12,005$ = twelve thousand (and?) five
  • $12,050$ = twelve thousand (and?) fifty
  • $12,500$ = twelve thousand (and?) five hundred.

(3) Is it the correct notation for recurring decimals in the UK?

$1.22345634563456... = 1.22$$\dot3$$45$$\dot6$

How is this number normally pronounced, 'one point two two (and?) three four five six repeating / repeated / recurring / recurred / into infinity'?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I like this question, but I think the tag is not so relevant. Maybe add the "notation" tag? $\endgroup$ – polfosol Feb 1 '17 at 6:01
  • $\begingroup$ I agree. The tag has been edited. $\endgroup$ – Fortesque Feb 1 '17 at 6:42
  • $\begingroup$ +1 for preparing in advance, and good luck. I'll let the more qualified answer, will just note that I've seen $4$ handwritten as $\mathcal{4}$ in the US quite often (along the alternative you posted). $\endgroup$ – dxiv Feb 1 '17 at 6:59
  • $\begingroup$ Your question on recurring decimals is correct, I would use that notation. In terms of the previous pronunciation question, I would say and in the first two bullets, not in the third. $\endgroup$ – complexmanifold Feb 1 '17 at 9:56
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you all. Bacon, and how would you pronounce this recurring decimal? $\endgroup$ – Fortesque Feb 1 '17 at 11:06

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.