11
$\begingroup$

So my partner and I thought it would be great if we could do some maths problems over Skype while we are apart (long distance). We'd like some recommendations on problem books that are ideal for working on together. We know there are quite a few questions online for best puzzle books in general but we'd like to know of any that have been written for or are suited for couple solving.

We are both fairly proficient in general but are not experts in any one topic. Ideally, the book should cover multiple fields with fairly difficult logic/maths problems.

As a starter list, what do people think of:

  • Raymond M. Smullyan - The Godelian puzzle book
  • Peter Winkler - Mathematical puzzles a connoisseur's collection
  • Raymond M. Smullyan - What is the name of this book?

I'm aware this is a rather strange request but thought it was worth asking just in case.

$\endgroup$
  • 7
    $\begingroup$ That's like my dream girlfriend. $\endgroup$ – MathematicsStudent1122 Jan 6 '17 at 21:59
  • $\begingroup$ Smullyan has more than 1 book................ There should be a book called Mathematics For Lovers...LOL............ What level of math /puzzle are you interested in? $\endgroup$ – DanielWainfleet Jan 7 '17 at 3:10
5
$\begingroup$

You might have some luck with the books of Martin Gardner. Many of these books are collections from his monthly column on Mathematical Puzzles, Games, and Diversions for Scientific American.

For instance, there is a widely-loved book including his article on Hexaflexagons. But he has many books.

Good luck!

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

No doubt, the book "Fifty Challenging Puzzles" in probability by Mosteller will likely be the most entertaining for probability puzzles. A good list is documented here along with the book from Mosteller. While other types of puzzles (word puzzles, geometric jigsaw etc) are interesting, probability puzzles adds an extra dimension to things because you can see it manifest all around you. Search for the "Inspection Paradox" and you will find lots of interesting applications and fun solving it over skype. HTH

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.