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Do the improper fractions include, "the fraction whose numerator is greater than or equal its denominator" or "the fraction whose numerator is greater only than the denominator"?

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  • $\begingroup$ If they are equal, then the fraction equals one, so I don't think there is much use for calling it a fraction anymore. $\endgroup$ – Guacho Perez Dec 19 '16 at 7:24
  • $\begingroup$ It means whatever the person using it says it means. If the person using it doesn't say what it means, then it is anyone's guess. Does it really matter? $\endgroup$ – Gerry Myerson Dec 19 '16 at 7:29
  • $\begingroup$ I do understand what you are saying, bu I am asking about the definition, mainly. $\endgroup$ – Mahmoud Elneweshy Dec 21 '16 at 11:35
  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "the definition"? Different people may use the term to mean different things. The purpose of a definition is to make it clear to everyone what terms mean. So, if you use the term, make it clear what you mean. End of problem. $\endgroup$ – Gerry Myerson Dec 22 '16 at 19:00
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Any fraction that would reduce to an integer and fraction, is an improper fraction. So 8/8 and 9/8 are both improper fractions, while 7/8 is a proper fraction.

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It should be stated at the beginning of your paper, whether you consider $\frac{a}{a}$ as an improper fraction od not. Point it out and continue with the convention you have just set on your work.

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A fraction with a numerator that is greater than or equal to the denominator is known as an improper fraction. It represents a number greater than or equal to one.

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