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I am trying to fit an equation to the data pictured. I want my students to be able to graph a y= equation. I have several different sets that all have a similar look to them. The pink graph I drew was just a guess but it kind of looks like a normal curve that is skewed. What would an equation be that might fit this data. (For reference, the x-axis tick marks are intervals of 50 and the y-axis tick marks are intervals of 1.)

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisson_distribution#/media/… -- take a look at $\lambda = 1$ $\endgroup$ – user8960 Oct 24 '16 at 17:04
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah but I'm looking for a y= equation that my students could graph. $\endgroup$ – MathZombie Oct 24 '16 at 17:06
  • $\begingroup$ Then you need to include all the necessary information in your question. The community should not work harder than you just to understand what exactly you need. $\endgroup$ – user8960 Oct 24 '16 at 17:09
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Comment. I have to say that this is an astonishingly unmotivated exercise. It is difficult to know how to take a useful approach to the curve-fitting. I used Minitab to fit a cubic regression equation. The resulting curve and (wide) prediction interval are shown below. The cubic equation is shown in the header. (A quadratic equation won't fit at all. I suppose there is a 10th degree polynomial that would fit "perfectly".)

enter image description here

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