0
$\begingroup$

I am stuck with my course work as an undergraduate. It says to write the following statement in the form of predicate logic. The statement is "e. Everyone knows some hard-working people." The one I wrote is "$∀x \space ∃y(People(x) ∧ People(y) ∧ (Hardworking(y) ∧Knows(x, y)))$" Is this correct??

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Your symbols aren't showing up for me. Please use MathJax $\endgroup$ – Alexis Olson Oct 18 '16 at 4:49
  • $\begingroup$ Edited the question $\endgroup$ – shamila Oct 18 '16 at 4:50
  • $\begingroup$ What is x? And what is People(x)? $\endgroup$ – nivekgnay Oct 18 '16 at 5:37
  • $\begingroup$ That's what I wrote and I think it is wrong. Can you tell me the write answer? $\endgroup$ – shamila Oct 18 '16 at 6:07
0
$\begingroup$

With these questions, there could potentially be a lot of correct answers, depending on how you define your variables.

One solution is to denote $P$ as the set of all people. Then we want to write something like "for any person x, there's another person y that is hardworking and that is known by x." Writing this in the mathematical logic notation, we would get $\forall x \in P, \exists y \in P \ni (Hardworking(y) \wedge Knows(x,y))$.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.