4
$\begingroup$

Is there any logical reason or just introduced "little" in the name randomly.

Wikipedia says that it is called "little theorem" to distinguish it from Fermat's last theorem. Then why we just chose little and not any other term?

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I guess that the little theorem has a more... little proof. $\endgroup$ – ajotatxe Oct 15 '16 at 12:51
  • 7
    $\begingroup$ Some languages like German (in which much of the 19th-century research on the Last Theorem was written in) call the Last Theorem the Great Theorem. Here the opposition is more clear. $\endgroup$ – Parcly Taxel Oct 15 '16 at 12:53
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Heh, what a strange and silly question! $\endgroup$ – Simply Beautiful Art Oct 15 '16 at 13:20
  • $\begingroup$ @ParclyTaxel I've never read or heard it called "Fermat's Great theorem". In German, I've only ever seen/heard it referred to as die Fermatsche Vermutung (Fermat's conjecture). $\endgroup$ – Daniel Fischer Oct 15 '16 at 14:48
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @ParclyTaxel Interesting. (I wouldn't know, 'cause I hardly ever look at the German wikipedia.) $\endgroup$ – Daniel Fischer Oct 15 '16 at 14:51
0
$\begingroup$

I believe it's called Fermat's Little Theorem since Euler later proved the more general theorem using his "Totient" function which then covered all integer modulus, not just the prime modulus.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.