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while doing a problem I have the following expression

$$\left| \begin{array}{cc} y_2 & y_3 \\ y_2'' & y_3'' \\ \end{array} \right| y_1 + \left| \begin{array}{cc} y_1 & y_3 \\ y_1'' & y_3'' \\ \end{array} \right| y_2 + \left| \begin{array}{cc} y_1 & y_2 \\ y_1'' & y_2'' \\ \end{array} \right| y_3 $$

Is there a way to write this as just one determinant? a 3by3 determinant of course

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$\left | \begin{array}{ccc} y_1 & -y_2 & y_3 \\ y_1 & y_2 & y_3 \\ y_1^" & y_2^" & y_3^" \end{array} \right |$

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  • $\begingroup$ ILoveMath ... and check that you did not make a sign mistake on your middle term $\endgroup$ – GEdgar Oct 3 '16 at 13:05
  • $\begingroup$ If ILoveMath made a sign mistake in his second term, then using your determinant method, the result would be zero. $\endgroup$ – GEdgar Oct 3 '16 at 13:34

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