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Last question I asked like this was a bit overkill so let's try something simpler instead.

How can I write an equation of the form <stuff with x>$=0$ that uses only $x$, such that the set of $x$ which satisfies the equation, when plotted, produces a 10 unit long line segment?

The idea of doing art with numbers interests me. Drawing a simple 1D line is part of the basics, I'd guess.

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    $\begingroup$ Are you looking for a way to plot the line $y=0$? What do you mean "produces" a line? $\endgroup$
    – pancini
    Sep 25, 2016 at 19:10
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    $\begingroup$ $y=0$ for $x \in [0,10]$ will plot that segment. $\endgroup$
    – dxiv
    Sep 25, 2016 at 19:18
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    $\begingroup$ What does "produce a straight line" mean? In a graph? On a number line? You could plot a one dimensional graph using $\pi r8$'s answer and get such a line. $\endgroup$
    – pancini
    Sep 26, 2016 at 1:38
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    $\begingroup$ @ElliotG Yes. So how's it unclear what I'm asking? They were able to answer it. $\endgroup$
    – SoniEx2
    Sep 26, 2016 at 17:59
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    $\begingroup$ Plot 0 <= x <= 10 I'm not sure how anything else in this thread can be construed to convey intent any differently than these inequations. $\endgroup$
    – user14972
    Sep 30, 2016 at 23:57

3 Answers 3

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Idea based on parabola going through $x=0$ and $x=10$ :

$x(x-10) + |x(x-10)|=0$

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You could write $\min(x,0)^2+\min(10-x,0)^2=0$.

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$[0 \leq x \leq 10] = 1$, where $[]$ is the Iverson bracket.

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