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I am learning Petri nets as a beginner. There is a Problem about the boundedness of a Petri net: Is there a Petri net that is bounded but has an infinite number of reachable markings?

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Given that the number of places is finite (by definition of Petri nets) and each place can have from zero to a bounded integer number of indistinguishable tokens (by definition of boundedness), it's pretty obvious the number of reachable markings is finite. Do you need a formal proof?

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  • $\begingroup$ Actually, the question is "Give an example of a Petri net that is bounded and has an infinite number of reachable markings". So.. $\endgroup$ – Lebs Sep 15 '16 at 2:13
  • $\begingroup$ Proving that the question is unsolvable is a valid answer. $\endgroup$ – Andris Birkmanis Sep 15 '16 at 2:34

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