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This question already has an answer here:

[CLOSED] Thanks GoodDeeds and Henry [1] I understood the fundamental problem.

As √9 = ± 3

If , √A = √B
Thus, ** ±a = ±b**
And so a = b; -a = b; and a = -b;;
Thus, √9 = +3 OR -3

Let, √A = ±a
and, √B = ±b
Is this reasoning correct?

If not how does this actually work?

[1] \bib{26369}{misc}{
title={Square roots -- positive and negative},
author={Henry (https://math.stackexchange.com/users/6460/henry)},
note={URL: https://math.stackexchange.com/q/26369 (version: 2011-03-11)},
eprint={https://math.stackexchange.com/q/26369},
organization={Mathematics Stack Exchange}
}

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marked as duplicate by 6005, Jack D'Aurizio, Community Sep 9 '16 at 13:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • $\begingroup$ The square root is a function, hence $\sqrt{9}=3$ and not $\pm 3$ at the same time. $\endgroup$ – Jack D'Aurizio Sep 9 '16 at 11:11
  • $\begingroup$ Also: math.stackexchange.com/questions/41878/… $\endgroup$ – 6005 Sep 9 '16 at 11:18
  • $\begingroup$ This question is different from the "duplicate". In particular it involves the interpretation of the statement $\pm a=\pm b$ and the conclusions that can be drawn from it in the frame of multivalued square roots. $\endgroup$ – Yves Daoust Sep 9 '16 at 14:25
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No. The mistake is that $\sqrt{9}\ne\pm3$, $\sqrt{9}=+3$ only.

This is because the square root function is defined such that only the non negative root is taken. In general, $$\sqrt{x^2}=|x|$$

Moreover, your reasoning will lead to absurd conclusions, such as $$\sqrt{9}=\sqrt{9}$$ $$+3=-3$$ which is obviously not true.

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As √9 = ± 3

No, the square root function is always $\ge 0$.

Thus, √9 = +3 OR -3

No, the square root function is always $\ge 0$.

Let, √A = ±a and, √B = ±b

No, the square root function is always $\ge 0$.

If , √A = √B Thus, ** ±a = ±b** And so a = b; -a = b; and a = -b;;

Is this reasoning correct?

The reasoning is not correct because the square root function is always $\ge 0$.

If not how does this actually work?

The square root function is always $\ge 0$.

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    $\begingroup$ Minor nitpick: the square root of zero is not positive. $\endgroup$ – Jack D'Aurizio Sep 9 '16 at 11:12
  • $\begingroup$ @JackD'Aurizio Fixed it :) $\endgroup$ – 6005 Sep 9 '16 at 11:18
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The definition of the square root of $x \in \mathbb{R}, x \geq 0$ is the only positive number $y \in \mathbb{R}, y \geq 0$ such taht $y^2=x$.

Your reasoning works with a different definition of the square root, which is a function $yoursqrt : \mathbb{R} \rightarrow \mathbb{R}^2 $

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