1
$\begingroup$

For plane trig we have Law of Sines

$$ \frac{ a}{\sin A} =\frac{ b }{\sin B} =\frac{ c }{\sin C}= 2 R $$

where $2R$ is the diameter of the circum-circle.There is a clear understanding of the relationship of lengths and angles of a plane triangle.

For spherical trig also, we have a Law of Sines

$$ \frac{ \sin a}{\sin A} =\frac{ \sin b }{\sin B} =\frac{ \sin c }{\sin C}=What?$$

where the invariant 3D object is geometrically unknown (at least to me). Just we know it is a number. There is no clear or complete understanding of the relationship of lengths and angles of spherical triangle.

May be it can be expressed in 4D geometry. Or, is it related to the $small$ circle's integral curvature circumscribing the vertices? I could not find reference in Todhunter/Leathem's (century old) text book.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

$$\frac{\sin a}{\sin A}= \frac{\sin a \sin b \sin c} {\sqrt{1-\cos^2 a-\cos^2 b-\cos^2 c+2\cos a \cos b \cos c}}$$

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I want to recognize it as a single geometric object not as an equation. $\endgroup$ – Narasimham Jul 26 '16 at 10:36

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.