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Would you please share your 2 cent on book recommendation for introductory topology book to graduate student in Economics.

Have exposure to the first half of the yearlong analysis course in the following books:

Baby Rudin.

Understanding Analysis by Abbott.

The Way of Analysis by Strichartz.

Yet Another Introduction to Analysis by Bryant.

The main reason for searching a good introductory topology book is to gain formal exposure to concepts like connected spaces, metri, pseudo metric spaces, products/quotients, separation axiom, ordered sets, compactification, etc.

My friend recommended Real Analysis with Economic Applications by Ok and if anybody had exposure with his book, also please share your experience with the book.

Thanks.

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I don't know what you're getting at by mentioning you're in economics, but if you have some first year analysis then Munkres' book is a fantastic introduction.

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  • $\begingroup$ Jake, thanks for the suggestion. $\endgroup$ – Frank Swanton Jun 21 '16 at 20:39
  • $\begingroup$ It starts off with some set theory to get your background up to par before it covers the point-set topology topics you covered, and then moves onto algebraic topology if you have any interest in that. $\endgroup$ – Jake Jun 21 '16 at 20:50
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Two possibilities:

Infinite Dimensional Analysis: A Hitchhiker's Guide by Charalambos D. Aliprantis and Kim Border

Topological Spaces: Including a Treatment of Multi-Valued Functions, Vector Spaces and Convexity by Claude Berge

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  • $\begingroup$ Dave, thanks for the suggestion. Are you an economist? $\endgroup$ – Frank Swanton Jun 21 '16 at 20:39
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not an economist -- I've only taken a couple of introductory economics courses (micro and macro) as electives when I was an undergraduate. I have a copy of Berge's book (has topics I'm interested in, cluster sets of functions and set valued analysis topics) and I remembered that he was in (or at least he wrote for) economics, and the other is a book I've seen in a nearby university library and have thought I might buy one day because it appears to have nice expositions of a lot of topics I'm somewhat interested in. $\endgroup$ – Dave L. Renfro Jun 21 '16 at 20:46
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You may consult the following two books which are very fundamental & easy to understand;

1) Topology & Modern Analysis by G. F. Simmon 2) General Topology by Seymour Lipschutz

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