1
$\begingroup$

Note that:

  1. N is positive integer.
  2. The set also consists of positive integers.
  3. The set consists of different integers. (The thread suggested by @hardmath doesn't have this constraint.)

For example:

if $N = 4$, we can construct the set as ${4}$, and the product is 4.

if $N = 5$, we can construct the set of two elements ${2, 3}$, and their product is 6.

if $N = 7$, we can construct the set of two elements ${3, 4}$, and their product is 12.

if $N = 31$, the set is {2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8}.

How to solve this problem for a general $N$? And how can you prove the correctness of your solution?

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.