1
$\begingroup$

Can an initial value problem have more than one, but still finitely many solutions? That is, can an IVP have only two or three solutions?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Your question is a little lacking in detail. $\endgroup$ – copper.hat May 11 '16 at 5:51
0
$\begingroup$

Your question does not seem to be clear but here is what I understood from it. There can always be more that one solution to the Initial value problem. But the solutions should be interpreted accordingly to arrive at the desired answer. Say, you are setting up a differential equation to find the heat flow through a bar or rod. You will do so and solve for the temperature of the bar at any point at a given time. See, I'm specifying so many conditions. So when you incorporate these conditions in your obtained general solution, you will arrive at the unique solution.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ My problem is that, an initial value problem can have either unique solution or infinite solution... is it true??? $\endgroup$ – SAHEB PAL May 11 '16 at 6:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.