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I got this question from my statistics teacher, but his answer made me confused. The question is this..

Given that A, B and C are three independent events such that P (A)=0.2 ,P(B)=0.6 ,P (C)=0.5, then the joint probability for the three events is:

a) 0.751 b) 0.06 c) 0.500 d) 0

My teacher said that "d" is the correct answer. However I believe that "b" is more reasonable answer, because the events are independent and also joint (not mutually exclusive). So what do you think?

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    $\begingroup$ independent leads to the product $0.06$, which mutually exclusive is not possible when the sum is greater than $1$ $\endgroup$
    – Henry
    May 6, 2016 at 13:05
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    $\begingroup$ Who is a statistics doctor? $\endgroup$
    – Aman
    May 6, 2016 at 13:12
  • $\begingroup$ The statistics doctor is the one who holds the cure for OP's teacher. $\endgroup$
    – jdods
    May 6, 2016 at 14:45
  • $\begingroup$ You don't need to say "joint" to assure "not mutually exclusive". If two events, P and Q, ARE mutually exclusive then the probability of "P given Q" or "Q given P" is 0 so they are not "independent". Any independent events are automatically "not mutually exclusive". $\endgroup$
    – user247327
    May 6, 2016 at 14:57

1 Answer 1

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b) is correct. By definition, the probability of the intersection of independent events is the product of the individual probabilities. Your teacher is wrong, or perhaps you misunderstood each other.

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