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I think both ways are possible in English, but should I say

This is a corollary to Theorem 1.2

or

This is a corollary of Theorem 1.2

?

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    $\begingroup$ The second one is clearly more common. $\endgroup$ – Captain Lama Mar 29 '16 at 15:20
  • $\begingroup$ For me, I usually use the first one. $\endgroup$ – Solumilkyu Mar 29 '16 at 15:23
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    $\begingroup$ "Clearly"? How so? $\endgroup$ – Unit Mar 29 '16 at 15:23
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    $\begingroup$ The books that I usually read uses the sencond ones. $\endgroup$ – DiegoMath Mar 29 '16 at 15:23
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In contemporary U.S. English, "corollary to X" would be (slightly intellectual-sounding) non-math usage, so also in-principle-legit in math, while the "corollary of X" is specific U.S.-math-English usage. The only slight bias might be to use "corollary of" because it sounds more typically math-y... ?

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