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I will be going into Calculus next year and my teacher recommended a TI-89 scientific calculator.

I have this calculator already; is it a TI-89? How do I tell? Would that be good enough for Calculus? Or should I buy another one?

What in particular will I need the calculator for? Do you use it a lot in Calculus?

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    $\begingroup$ -1. Doesn't really fit with the type of questions that are supposed to be asked here. $\endgroup$
    – ODP
    Mar 3, 2016 at 0:24
  • $\begingroup$ Though you will most likely not be able to use a graphing calculator like a TI-89 on exams it can be really helpful to have one when you are just starting out in calculus, because being able to see the graphs and experiment with them teaches you a lot. $\endgroup$
    – wgrenard
    Mar 3, 2016 at 1:08
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure, but I think the calculator you linked to is a CASIO fx-82MS and not a Texas Instruments TI-89. $\endgroup$
    – JRN
    Mar 3, 2016 at 4:27

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I've gone through Calc 1, 2 and 3 (I believe this is where most american universities see stokes' theorem and the like) and I've never ever needed an expensive calculator.

The only thing you'll be using it for is calculating roots or aiding in arithmetic, in my opinion, so your current calculator is absolutely fine.

Besides, most cellphones now support stuff like symbolab, $W$olfram$|A$lpha, etc. So big calculators are not really needed.

PD: A quick amazon search shows you what a TI-89 is.

E: Also, you should check out Desmos' graphing calculator it's an excellent resource for beggining calculus students, it's incredibly easy to use and gives you a good grasp of many problems.

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It depends on what you are permitted to use in the exam (i.e. what are the rules?).

If you are allowed advanced graphing calculators then Texas TI-89 is perfect. I have seen people using them and they can do everything such as graphing, integrating and differentiating.

In all the exams I have ever sat that have involved calculus (I am now 20, so I have sat a fair few) we have not been allowed to use these calculators and would be disqualified from the exam. In this case, the best calculators are your standard scientific calculator that every English student has - CASIO fx-83GT PLUS. Absolutely nothing wrong with these, and will certainly be allowed in any exam. Also looks similar to the one you have, but I would check. They basically do everything except from calculus and graphing, but sitting a calculus exam I would expect that you are expected do it all by hand anyway.

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    $\begingroup$ I think this is the first time I've ever seen a question downvoted and called off-topic, and then answered, by the same person... $\endgroup$
    – pjs36
    Mar 3, 2016 at 0:28
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    $\begingroup$ Haha, why not? I have had questions downvoted in the past, and always thought, "Couldn't you have just given me a quick answer"? $\endgroup$
    – ODP
    Mar 3, 2016 at 0:48
  • $\begingroup$ Haha.. thanks for the answer. Maybe the TI-89 is recommended for class work / practice but not the actual exams. $\endgroup$
    – Abs
    Mar 3, 2016 at 18:33
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    $\begingroup$ Why has this got a downvote? Perfectly legitimate answer. $\endgroup$
    – ODP
    Mar 3, 2016 at 20:42
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Choose one

$\Box$ Sharp EL-W535X

$\Box$ An iPhone with Wolfram alpha App

$\Box$ Your own mind.

Personally, I would choose the third option.

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  • $\begingroup$ Can I get the iPhone for free? $\endgroup$ Mar 3, 2016 at 18:37

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