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Notation in my book, Introduction to Probability and Mathematical Statistics by Bain and Engelhardt, is $x_{1:n}$ and $x_{n:n}$. For example, see Example 10.2.3 (page 340). Here is a screenshot.

Can anybody tell me what this denotes?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Shailesh, hardmath, coldnumber, Claude Leibovici, JMP Feb 5 '16 at 7:42

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    $\begingroup$ You might need to include more detail. Usually, notations don't have a unique meaning. $\endgroup$ – Em. Feb 5 '16 at 3:00
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    $\begingroup$ Most likely it stands for $x_1, x_2, \ldots , x_n$ $\endgroup$ – Shailesh Feb 5 '16 at 3:02
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    $\begingroup$ Notation in which book? $\endgroup$ – David G. Stork Feb 5 '16 at 3:04
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    $\begingroup$ Sorry if I wasn't very specific. I believe @Shailesh is correct. Thanks $\endgroup$ – Bbb Feb 5 '16 at 3:05
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    $\begingroup$ Tell us what book? Help people help you. $\endgroup$ – Thomas Andrews Feb 5 '16 at 3:07
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In my experience this might denote a sequence of numbers $x_{1}$, $x_{2}$, ..., $x_{n}$

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