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(This is problem P-3.7 from the book 'Signal processing first')

Let $x(t) = 2\cos(\omega_1t)\cos(\omega_2t) = \cos([\omega_1 + \omega2]t)+\cos([\omega_2 - \omega_1]t)$

where $0 < \omega_1 < \omega_2$

Then what relation needs to hold for $\omega_1 + \omega2, \ \omega_2 - \omega1 ,\ \omega_1$ and $\omega_2$ such that $x(t)$ is periodic with period $T_0$, e.g $x(t) = x(t + T_0)$?

I know that $$ \gcd(\omega_1+\omega_2, \omega_2-\omega_1) = 2\pi/T_0$$ By the definition of the fundamental frequency. But I don't know if this yields any relationship for $\omega_1$ and $\omega_2$.

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  • $\begingroup$ Changing frequency by addition of signals and addition of time delay for entire signal are quite different things. $\endgroup$
    – Narasimham
    Commented Dec 12, 2015 at 21:29
  • $\begingroup$ I forgot to include the $t$'s. $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 12, 2015 at 21:31
  • $\begingroup$ What have you tried? What are you stuck on? You have just copied a homework problem from a text book and are expecting someone else to do it for you. $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 13, 2015 at 15:24
  • $\begingroup$ Let me understand what is given and what is required. iHow to combine waves of circular frequencies $ \omega_1, \omega_ 2 $ to get a superposed waveform of given time period $ T_0$, is that your question? $\endgroup$
    – Narasimham
    Commented Dec 13, 2015 at 16:54
  • $\begingroup$ The question is to find a relation for the frequencies $w_1, w_2$ that needs to hold for $x(t)$ to have a period $T_0$. $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 13, 2015 at 17:04

1 Answer 1

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Consider $t = 0$ to start from and expand $x(t+T_0)$ and we get :

$$x(0) = cos(0) + cos(0) = 2$$

$$x(T_0) = cos((w_2+w_1)T_0) + cos((w_2-w_1)T_0) = 2$$

But that requires :

$$(w_2+w_1)T_0 = 2K\pi$$ $$(w_2-w_1)T_0 = 2L\pi$$

for some K, L integers.

Thus

$$w_2T_0 = (K+L)\pi$$ $$w_1T_0 = (K-L)\pi$$

And if we substitute these forms back into our original expressions :

$$x(t+T_0) = cos((w_2+w_1)t)cos((w_2+w_1)T_0)$$ $$ - sin((w_2+w_1)t)sin((w_2+w_1)T_0)$$ $$ + cos((w_2-w_1)t)cos((w_2-w_1)T_0)$$ $$ + sin((w_2-w_1)T_0)sin((w_2-w_1)t)$$

$$x(t+T_0) = cos((w_2+w_1)t)cos(2K\pi)$$ $$ - sin((w_2+w_1)t)sin(2K\pi)$$ $$ + cos((w_2-w_1)t)cos(2L\pi)$$ $$ + sin((w_2-w_1)T_0)sin(2L\pi)$$

The only terms we are left with are :

$$x(t+T_0) = cos((w_2+w_1)t) + cos((w_2-w_1)t) = x(t)$$

Hence the relation for the periods is :

$$w_2T_0 = (K+L)\pi$$ $$w_1T_0 = (K-L)\pi$$

for some K, L integers.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks! I'd like to add that from this follows $\omega_2 = \omega_1 + (2\pi/T_0)L$ and $\omega_1 = -\omega_2 + (2\pi/T_0)K$, which I think might be the relation the book was after. $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 13, 2015 at 19:39

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