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We are often taught that $f'$ came from Newton and $\frac{df}{dx}$ came from Leibniz, but who introduced $Df$? Are there other notations for this simple idea by famous mathematicians?

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  • $\begingroup$ Wikipedia calls it "Euler's notation". Things are misnamed all the time in math, but maybe Euler came up with it. $\endgroup$ – user137731 Oct 30 '15 at 0:34
  • $\begingroup$ Some related discussion is given for this History of Science and Math Question. $\endgroup$ – hardmath Oct 30 '15 at 0:40
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According to Wikipedia, this is Euler's notation. You can find some more discussion of notations on the linked page. One other notation of particular note is $\dot x$ to mean the derivative of a quantity $x$ with respect to time. This is a reasonably common notation in physics, though is less often seen in pure mathematical contexts.

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Newton came up with $\dot{y}(t)$ (fluxion), which is still used in physics. Lagrange with $f'$. According to this source $D$ was used (as operator) by Arbogast first.

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