1
$\begingroup$

I saw these bumper stickers this morning. Can anyone please explain the two with the equations? Why would anyone have them on their car? Is there humor in them that I am missing?

(I did get an A in my college Calculus class. But, I don't remember the formulas.)

Bumper Stickers

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ The left-hand side equation is Maxwell-Faraday's equation in electromagnetism. The right-ghand side equation is the First Fundamental theorem of integral calculus. $\endgroup$ – Bernard Oct 25 '15 at 20:37
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, Bernard. I have read a little bit about Maxwell and Faraday. I read that Maxwell should be considered as important as Newton or Einstein for what he discovered. But, he is often overlooked. I will search more with the information you kindly provided. $\endgroup$ – Junco Oct 26 '15 at 14:11
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Bernard there is no more to be said. You should consider writing your comment as an answer. $\endgroup$ – davidlowryduda Oct 26 '15 at 14:19
  • $\begingroup$ @mixedmath: I don't think it's that important. Your curiosity is satisfied, and it's the main point. $\endgroup$ – Bernard Oct 26 '15 at 14:28
  • $\begingroup$ @Bernard in terms of this question, that's true. But in time, the system will cause this question to be brought back to the front page automatically every once in a while (since it's upvoted but has no answers). The system does this to encourage answers on good questions. But this question does not need an answer, as it is answered. Further, a large number of users browse the unanswered questions --- they find it fun to answer questions for others. This question shows up there, but it shouldn't. $\endgroup$ – davidlowryduda Oct 26 '15 at 15:12
3
$\begingroup$

The left-hand side equation is Maxwell-Faraday's equation in electromagnetism. The right-ghand side equation is the First Fundamental theorem of integral calculus.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Note that someone who took "a college calculus class" might have seen the second equation at some point, but probably would not have seen the first one. $\endgroup$ – Michael Seifert Oct 26 '15 at 16:20
  • $\begingroup$ Yes it must be seen in some electromagnetism class. $\endgroup$ – Bernard Oct 26 '15 at 16:25
  • $\begingroup$ I was very happy to get an "A" in that calculus class. I worked very hard at it. I had a very good teacher. He was a graduate assistant. It was similar to the advanced statistics class that I took in that the students in the class either got an "A" or failed. I don't know why that happens. $\endgroup$ – Junco Oct 27 '15 at 18:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.