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Every continuous smooth real function f(x) is either odd , even, or sum/difference of an even and odd (mixed like e.g., exponential) functions. Is this generally correct?

Can the even part of a mixed f(x) and odd part of another mixed g(x) be combined to make a new combo h(x)? If so how so and if not why not?

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Do such hybrid h(x) satisfy mean value theorem? Will there be no problem with computing their curvatures and inflection points? I asked this as I somehow feel that a mixed Taylor series has some of its " chemistry" or nature altered.

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    $\begingroup$ Are Taylor series allowed in the answer? $\endgroup$ – imranfat Oct 13 '15 at 18:15
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, afik that is the only way such a function is constituted. $\endgroup$ – Narasimham Oct 13 '15 at 18:21
  • $\begingroup$ Well, then it's a done deal... $\endgroup$ – imranfat Oct 13 '15 at 18:22
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You don't need smooth, or even continuous. Any function $f(x)$ is the sum of the two functions $$ \frac{f(x) - f(-x)}{2}\quad,\quad \frac{f(x) + f(-x)}{2} $$ where the first one is odd and the second one is even. If $f$ itself is odd or even, then one of the fractions above evaluates to $0$ and the other to $f(x)$. These parts can be freely added to the corresponding parts of other functions.

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Write $$ f(x) = \frac{f(x)+f(-x)}{2}+\frac{f(x)-f(-x)}{2} = f_e(x) + f_o(x) $$ This means \begin{align} (f + g)(x) &= f(x) + g(x) \\ &= (f_e(x) + f_o(x) )+ (g_e(x) + g_o(x) ) \\ &= (f_e + g_e)(x) + (f_o + g_o)(x) \\ &= (f+g)_e(x) + (f+g)_o(x) \end{align} If $f = F_e$ and $g = G_o$ then \begin{align} (f+g)_e &= f_e + g_e = F_e + 0 = F_e \\ (f+g)_o &= f_o + g_o = 0 + G_o= G_o \end{align}

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