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Is there any nice text book for sheaf theory for an under gradute student? Tennison's sheaf thory was too hard for me, Please help me, Thanke you very much.

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migrated from mathoverflow.net Aug 5 '15 at 20:20

This question came from our site for professional mathematicians.

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    $\begingroup$ Have you tried typing "Sheaf theory" into a search at a book retailer? $\endgroup$ – Ryan Budney Aug 5 '15 at 17:56
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    $\begingroup$ I like MacLane and Moerdijk's book on Topos theory for this, but I agree the question is not really appropriate for this site. If you reask on math.stackexchange, I recommend including what you want to learn about sheaves for. The answer may be very different if you want to do sheaf cohomology vs. if you want to study internal logic of categories of sheaves for example. Perhaps learning about sheaves in their original home of several complex variables would be interesting. For this I would recommend Joseph Taylor's book. $\endgroup$ – Steven Gubkin Aug 5 '15 at 19:03
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If Tennison is too hard, I'm not sure this will be a better suggestion, but a good gentle introduction is Swan's The Theory of Sheaves. Another possibility is just having a look at the first chapter or so of Bredon's Sheaf Theory. Overall Bredon gets very complicated, but it has a pretty modern style and Chapter I should be pretty readable. In fact I'd recommend about the first 60 or 70 pages and then maybe just a bit of Chapter III and the first few sections of Chapter IV. That all might still be too much for an undergraduate, but I'm not sure there's anything simpler. To learn about sheaves, at a minimum you need to know some algebra and topology.

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