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From the 1991 Canada National Olympiad:

Can ten distinct numbers $a_1, a_2, b_1, b_2, b_3, c_1, c_2, d_1, d_2, d_3$ be chosen from $\{0, 1, 2, \dotsc, 14\}$ so that the $14$ differences $$ \begin{matrix} |a_1 − b_1| & |a_1 − b_2| & |a_1 − b_3| \\ |a_2 − b_1| & |a_2 − b_2| & |a_2 − b_3| \\ |c_1 − d_1| & |c_1 − d_2| & |c_1 − d_3| \\ |c_2 − d_1| & |c_2 − d_2| & |c_2 − d_3| \\ \end{matrix} \\ \begin{matrix} |a_1 − c_1| & |a_2 − c_2| \end{matrix} $$ are all distinct?

My observations so far:

  • There are $14$ differences, none of which can be zero. So the differences must comprise the set $\{1, 2, \dotsc , 14\}$.

  • The ten numbers must include both of $\{0, 14\}$ and at least one of $\{1, 13\}$.

  • Subsets $A, C$ are the most central, as they also have differences with each other. If trying to construct a positive example for the choice of ten numbers, an unwise choice of $a_1, a_2$ or $c_1, c_2$ may quickly restrict other choices. Subsets $B, D$ are less central and could perhaps accomodate more awkward choices.

The diagram indicates which pairwise set differences are included in the $14$. Note that the dotted line from $A$ to $C$ indicates that not all combinations of pairwise differences are taken.

Pairwise differences

Some of the work of Solomon Golomb, e.g. a Golomb Ruler, may be of tangential interest, although the solution to this problem must be simpler than that.

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1 Answer 1

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Concept tested: Parity

Observe that each term appears an even number of times in all of the absolute values.

Can the sum of absolute values be $1+2+3+\ldots + 14 = 105$?

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  • $\begingroup$ ... and very quick! $\endgroup$
    – Marconius
    Commented Jul 20, 2015 at 0:41
  • $\begingroup$ That's a neat trick! $\endgroup$
    – Brian Tung
    Commented Jul 20, 2015 at 0:51

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