2
$\begingroup$

Given a smooth, rotationally symmetric Gaussian curvature profile, $G(r)$, how can we know if it is embeddable in $R^3$?

$G(r)$ is defined on $r=[0,R)$ where $r$ is the geodesic length from a fixed point and $R$ is finite. (So $G$ is defined on a disc).

Note that the Gaussian curvature is symmetric under rotations in the material coordinates, but the embedded shape need not be rotationally symmetric in $R^3$. For instance, a saddle with constant negative curvature has a rotationally symmetric $G(r)$ but is not a surface of revolution. In the image below, $G$ is constant along the green geodesic circles.

In other words, are there criteria for whether or not we can build a surface which has the given Gaussian curvature distribution?

Thanks!

Gaussian curvature is constant on the green geodesic circles, which are equidistant in geodesic length from the center point P.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.