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I am trying to search on MathSciNet for an article which contains $C^*$ in its title (as in $C^*$-algebras) however I can't figure out how to get MathSciNet not to interpret the '*' as a stand in for an arbitrary sequence of characters.

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  • $\begingroup$ I have retagged the question, The (searching) tag is for various search algorithms studied in computer science. If somebody can come up with more suitable tags, it would be nice. $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak May 20 '15 at 6:13
  • $\begingroup$ BTW I have mentioned your question in MO chatroom. Maybe somebody, who can answer, will notice it there. $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak May 20 '15 at 6:31
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. I agree that "searching" didn't seem to fit, but it wouldn't let me post without adding a tag and it wouldn't let me create my own tag. $\endgroup$ – Nate Ackerman May 20 '15 at 6:31
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    $\begingroup$ You should be able to search MathSciNet using the AMS classification codes for topics and subtopics. My number theory/ quadratic forms articles are usually 11E20 and a few related codes. Just look at the bottom of the first page of some recent articles you like, or the reviews of some articles you like, and write down the most useful AMS subject codes for your interests. $\endgroup$ – Will Jagy May 20 '15 at 19:33
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    $\begingroup$ Probably it should be mentioned that the help does not contain any solution for this: ams.org/mathscinet/help/full_search_help_full.html (Unless I have overlooked it.) $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak May 23 '15 at 3:54
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I have emailed technical support at MathSciNet. Unfortunately they do not know how to search for a string containing a *, as * is interpreted as a wild card. However, if you know the word before and after the * then you can use the proximity search tool adjN which is a stand in for at most N-1 words.

For example, searching for "C adj2 algebra" will find "$C^*$-algebra", as well as "l.m.c. algebras".

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