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Is it possible to create in WolframAlpha an animated plot of a curve given by an equation, where some of the coefficients depend on the parameter (=on time)?

For example if I would like to have a plot $x^2+2xy+3y^2+x+y=t$, which would show for each $t$ one of concentric ellipses and from the plot we could see how the curve changes when $t$ is changed. (The parameter $t$ stands for time.) Or a plot of $x^2+2xy-3y^2+x-y=t$, which could illustrate evolution of a family of hyperbolas.

Or is something like this possible only if I subscribe to the Pro version?

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  • $\begingroup$ Maybe I should mention that according to this discussion on meta, questions about WA are on-topic on this iste. $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak May 18 '15 at 7:30
  • $\begingroup$ Even if it is on-topic, I guess that you will get better help on the Mathematica SE site for this kind of question. $\endgroup$ – mickep May 18 '15 at 9:17
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    $\begingroup$ @mickep From what I read here and here it seems that questions like this would be closed as off-topic on that site. $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak May 18 '15 at 9:25
  • $\begingroup$ OK, I see. That's a pity. Good luck in finding a way (I was not able to, while trying a bit). $\endgroup$ – mickep May 18 '15 at 10:29
  • $\begingroup$ According to what I was told in chat, it is not possible to create animations in WA. (At least not with the free version.) $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak May 18 '15 at 11:23
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According to the help in Mathematica 10, you could do something like this:

ListAnimate[Table[WolframAlpha[StringJoin["contour plot x^2+2xy+3y^2+x+y==", ToString[t]]], {t,0,5,1}]]

This shows a plot for each of the values $t=0,1,2,3,4,5$.

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  • $\begingroup$ Unfortunately, this does not seem to work: wolframalpha.com/input/… (Or I'm doing something wrong.) $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak May 18 '15 at 8:53
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    $\begingroup$ That command is for Mathematica 10. I do not think it is possible to create such interactive plots in WolframAlpha; at least, in the free version... $\endgroup$ – AugSB May 18 '15 at 9:01

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