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I have came accross few lines in my reading/discussion like

  1. any signal can be represented by summation of elementary Signals.these elementary signals are called as basis(sometimes read as bases?) functions.

2.Also,in Fourier series ,the terms like bases functions are there to do Fourier decomposition.

3.Any image can be represented using summation of basis (in some discussions read as bases) images .

I am a bit confused with the two terms in functions i.e. bases function and basis function. I thought they are one and the same.

So whether terms Bases functions and Basis functions are same or different?

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  • $\begingroup$ Give us some context. Maybe one sentence from the literature using each? $\endgroup$ Apr 29 '15 at 7:32
  • $\begingroup$ @Gerry Myerson Sir,I have edited my question. Please,go through it. $\endgroup$
    – pandu
    Apr 29 '15 at 8:04
  • $\begingroup$ "Bases" is the plural form of the word "basis". The phrase "bases functions" sounds very strange to my ears and I don't think I know any scenario where it would be natural to use it. "Basis functions", on the other hand, is used all the time (and it means the functions which are members of a given basis for some function space). $\endgroup$ Apr 29 '15 at 8:39
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    $\begingroup$ I only see one person in that discussion using "bases function", and it is clear to me that that person is making many mistakes in English usage, so draw a conclusion from that. $\endgroup$ Apr 29 '15 at 9:43
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    $\begingroup$ Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". Only one person uses the word, "bases". And that person doesn't know English. $\endgroup$ Apr 29 '15 at 9:56
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It has been said that the universal language of Science is broken English.

OP has only provided one example of a person writing "bases functions", and that person's English is, shall we say, a non-standard dialect. Until/unless further examples are provided, it seems safe to say that "bases functions" is an idiosyncratic way of saying "basis functions".

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