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I have a little background on basic permutations and combinations and that's all prob/stat that I have in my body. So as a starter I don't want to divulge to the higher concepts of this discipline. With that said I want to find a book that can give me a solid foundation in counting ,venn diagrams, and reasoning. Can anyone the suggest a book or online material that will help? Thanks.

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closed as too broad by Daniel W. Farlow, Hagen von Eitzen, Claude Leibovici, Willie Wong, user99914 Mar 23 '15 at 8:41

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ We're all normal here, dude :-) $\endgroup$ – Autolatry Mar 10 '15 at 12:39
  • $\begingroup$ @Autolatry I highly doubt that... $\endgroup$ – Daniel W. Farlow Mar 23 '15 at 6:13
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    $\begingroup$ Normal Dude is the unsung superhero of the masses. At dawn, he dons his cloths and goes out to school, studying whatever it is needs to be studied, and at night he goes to sleep. $\endgroup$ – Asaf Karagila Mar 23 '15 at 6:13
  • $\begingroup$ @AsafKaragila Why can't Unsung Superhero be a badge instead of the rather prosaic Unsung Hero? $\endgroup$ – Daniel W. Farlow Mar 23 '15 at 6:19
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I found that Eccle's book on Mathematical Reasoning was good and easy to read for beginning set theory and counting. I actually think that book helped me in probability since I took that class first.

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  • $\begingroup$ It's kinda old, but I'll try to preview it. $\endgroup$ – Jansen Lopez Mar 10 '15 at 7:19
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I suggest you read Samuel Goldberg's Probability: An Introduction. It is a clearly written introduction to discrete probability that begins with a discussion of set theory and includes a chapter on basic combinatorics.

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Look up: Fifty Challenging Problems in Probability.

For something more serious: Larsen and Marx's Introduction to Mathematical Statistics

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