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Is there any analogue for taylor series for multivariable functions? In other words, can we rewrite any function as a sum of algebraic terms? For example, $x^y$. Can it be written of the form $\sum C_{m,n}x^my^n$, where $C_{m,n}$ is some constant pertaining to the particular m,n (most probably in terms of $\frac{\partial^m}{\partial x^m}x^y$ etc). Is there a generalization for more then two variables?

Another example would be $\frac{x+y}{x^2+y^2}$.

I suspect that it can be derived by using partial differentials and mashing together the taylor expansions of $f(x,constant)$ and $f(constant,y)$, but I can't manage to do it.

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2 Answers 2

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Yes, such a thing exists and is well-known. Any good book on functions of several variables will have it. This article has a sketch of it.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks! It hadn't occured to me to try out mixed partials. $\endgroup$ Feb 19, 2012 at 16:04
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It looks like you didn't even check the most obvious source which is wikipedia

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