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I am reading a new text, and I have come across the notation '$\Subset$' as well as '$\subset$'. Am I correct in assuming that '$\Subset$' is an alternative method of specifying an improper subset like the usual '$\subseteq$'?

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    $\begingroup$ What text? What's it all about? Context is everything. And have you consulted the end pages? Sometimes authors have a rundown of symbols there. $\endgroup$
    – Jon
    Jan 17, 2015 at 0:10
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, I checked the end pages once and overlooked it the first time. $\endgroup$
    – user137769
    Jan 17, 2015 at 0:21

2 Answers 2

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The symbol has no standard meaning. It is up to each author who uses it to supply a definition and explanation of what he uses it to mean, early enough to avoid confusing the reader.

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After scanning through the end pages more carefully, I found embarrassingly that I missed the answer the first time I looked! In this context (locally integrable functions under Lebesgue measure), the symbol was used to represent a subset whose closure is compact and is also a subset.

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