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I have taken: Calc 1, 2, & 3, Introduction to Discrete Math, and Introduction to Statistics.

The maths I learn I wish to be most applicable to programming (any kind of programming, game, physics, AI, etc ...)

Classes I get to choose from, bold ones are ones I have chosen

  • Introduction to Proof,
  • Foundations of Analysis,
  • Foundations of Algebra,
  • Intermediate Analysis I,
  • Axiomatic Geometry,
  • Ordinary Differential Equations,
  • Linear Algebra,
  • Combinatorics,
  • Introduction to Abstract Algebra,
  • Probability and Statistics I,
  • Dynamical Systems,
  • Numerical Methods (= numerical analysis? Do I have to take anything before this?)

Would these classes help the most? Would you recommend any other classes that are perhaps not on this list? A class in physics with calculus perhaps?

Also all I need is a short answer, yes or no, is the knowledge of any math applicable to programming?

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To answer your question, yes, math is very applicable to programming.

Linear and Combinatorics are excellent choices.

It's a bummer that there isn't an Intro to Number Theory course on your list because that class could teach you a lot of tools that you could use a programmer to find elegant solutions to complicated problems. Also, the mindset that a number theory class would install in you would serve you well as a problem solver.

As for the classes from your list, I would recommend either Intro to Abstract Algebra or Intro to Proofs. It would do best to install that same problem-solving mindset that number theory would.

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  • $\begingroup$ there is a 'Discrete Mathematics for Computing' but i figure it was the same as intro to discrete just a different name. and no theres no number theory only courses $\endgroup$ – hit Nov 29 '14 at 1:49
  • $\begingroup$ @hit It probably is about the same. Depending on your situation (do you need these class for a degree?, etc) you might want to ask a professor for a book recommendation for either number theory or for more advanced discrete mathematics material. If you think there is a professor who would be willing, you could ask to do some independent study with them. $\endgroup$ – Mike Pierce Nov 29 '14 at 1:56

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