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I used to have a set theory textbook downloaded free from the internet. I lost my laptop in the airport of a city in Eastern Europe, and it was not found (or perhaps “not found”) by the airport security. I now try to rediscover the file. I remember the author was a female mathematician from Berkeley. From an internet search I believe that it might have been Julia Robinson, but I still can’t find the book.

It had a fair number of exercises and I believe it covered Gödel’s incompleteness theorem. I would be grateful for help to find the book.

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  • $\begingroup$ Wikipedia lists no publications of a book by Julia Robinson, but that might be incomplete. $\endgroup$ – Thomas Andrews Oct 31 '14 at 22:45
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    $\begingroup$ I do not recall Julia Robinson writing a set theory book. Perhaps you are thinking of Judith Roitman? (Her textbook should be downloadable from her page, though she is not at Berkeley.) $\endgroup$ – Andrés E. Caicedo Oct 31 '14 at 22:46
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, it was Roitman. Introduction to Modern Set Theory. Excellent. $\endgroup$ – Mikael Jensen Nov 1 '14 at 18:36
  • $\begingroup$ After you ask a question here, if you get an acceptable answer, you should "accept" the answer by clicking the check mark ✓ next to it. This scores points for you and for the person who answered your question. You can find out more about accepting answers here: How do I accept an answer?, Why should we accept answers? $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Jan 20 '15 at 9:57
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There is the book "Introduction to Modern Set Theory" located here by Judith Roitman. Might that be the book you're thinking of?

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    $\begingroup$ Yes it was. Thanks. $\endgroup$ – Mikael Jensen Nov 1 '14 at 18:37
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if you google the title of your questions, one of the links shown is to the collected works of Julia Robinson, and google books does indeed show you a discussion of Godel's incompleteness theorem on one of the pages

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. This is also interesting but I was wrong about Robinson. It was Roitman all along. I am deeply impressed by all the brilliant females from Berkeley. $\endgroup$ – Mikael Jensen Nov 1 '14 at 23:25
  • $\begingroup$ Yes I have seen the set theory book by Roitman (and I have seen the author a few times at conferences) but I do not have the book, and could not remember if it had a section about Goedel's theorem. I should point out Mary Ellen Rudin (who passed away a couple of years ago) kind of unique book Lectures on set theoretic topology (1975), not quite the same area, but my advisor used it when I was a student. $\endgroup$ – Mirko Nov 2 '14 at 3:52

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