1,543 reputation
747
bio website
location India
age
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Aug 28 at 11:39

I am Iyengar, and I hail from South India, from a rural city. I have completed my engineering in computer science, but I was always interested in advanced physics, mathematics, philosophy and cognition and evolutionary theories. Because I barely have any teacher along with me to teach me, and no proper library, I did quite a bit of self learning from the internet, and roughly learned many diverse concepts, starting from Quantum mechanics, to Algebraic geometry, Galois theory, philosophy and cognition. I didn't have a path so I dumped down all the knowledge that was available before me. I had generated some ideas to solve Millennium prize problems and some ideas in Quantum mechanics, which have to be made concrete, and since I didn't have a proper channeling, all my ideas and work went unnoticed.

Nevertheless I continue to go further, seeking knowledge. Knowledge is power.


Aug
13
comment A tricky but silly doubt regarding the solutions of $x^2/(y-1)^2=1$
@anon : Thank you, I always have trouble with homophones.
Aug
13
revised A tricky but silly doubt regarding the solutions of $x^2/(y-1)^2=1$
added something
Aug
13
comment A tricky but silly doubt regarding the solutions of $x^2/(y-1)^2=1$
@RahulNarain : Thank you for your edit.
Aug
13
comment On Albanese varieties
@MakotoKato : Yes sir, it happened to me many times. Many people here are filled with grudges and I think you too know it and experienced it . But Thank you for your response. We never care about the reputation, and we should make it explicit. Either they must change or we must. I think the latter is better.
Aug
13
asked A tricky but silly doubt regarding the solutions of $x^2/(y-1)^2=1$
Aug
13
comment On Albanese varieties
@MakotoKato : Its common in MO and Math.SE , to down-vote without any reason. I have shouted, requested , begged and did everything , to explain the reason for down voting , but no one cared. Apart from reducing the reputation, if users post the reason its useful for constructing good questions next time. But I don't know why everyone is not that CIVIC. Thank you sir.
Aug
7
comment Rain droplets falling on a table
+1, Really salute to your efforts in posting such a lengthy answer.
Aug
5
comment How does a Class group measure the failure of Unique factorization?
@MTurgeon : Good one..
Aug
5
comment How does a Class group measure the failure of Unique factorization?
@KevinCarlson : That is what I was exactly looking for. It is crystal clear now. I understood clearly. For example, every multiple of $8$ is a multiple of $1$ but the converse is not true. Thank you for explaining.
Aug
5
comment How does a Class group measure the failure of Unique factorization?
@KevinCarlson : Great, I understood my mistake now. Oh, so now, you mean that taking out all the principal fractional ideals is what the class group does right ? If so why Principal fractional ideals ?
Aug
4
awarded  Suffrage
Aug
4
comment Area of a polygon
I salute your sincerity in keeping Community wiki, which shows that you are not interested in reputation .
Aug
4
comment Area of a polygon
@t.b. : You are exactly right , But OP could have added a reference , about the book in which he has seen the formula, in order to facilitate others .
Aug
4
comment Area of a polygon
Its very hard to figure out the answer, without knowing whether you are looking at a regular or irregular polygon . But I think that typing " derive area of polygon " in Google may fetch you lots of links. Prefer Google before moving your question to Math.SE. Thank you.
Aug
4
comment How does a Class group measure the failure of Unique factorization?
Thank you for your answer. But what does the exact quotient group mean ? I had a tough time in understanding what does one get when one looks at quotient group. Suppose we are having { Fractional Ideals of F } / { Principal fractional ideals of F }. Then what are we looking at exactly ? . Every ideal is a principal ideal , i.e every ideal can be written as $I=\alpha.(1)$ . Doesn't it imply that every ideal is principal ? Forgive me if I am wrong.
Aug
4
comment How does a Class group measure the failure of Unique factorization?
Thanks a lot for your edit Mr. M Turgeon
Aug
4
comment Karatsuba Multiplication
@mixedmath : Perfect answer, I was going to type what you have added in the comment, and you saved my effort of typing again , Thanks . But to add something, David, this types of strategies fall under something called " [Divide and conquer strategies ](en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divide_and_conquer_algorithm) , where you divide the initial problem into pieces and later on assemble them into a the original problem. Rest of the thing is neatly explained in mixedmath's version.
Aug
4
revised How does a Class group measure the failure of Unique factorization?
added something
Aug
4
comment How does a Class group measure the failure of Unique factorization?
Thanks a lot for your answer. +1
Aug
4
comment How does a Class group measure the failure of Unique factorization?
Good answer, Thank you sir +1