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2d
revised Caden has 4/3 kg of sand which fills 2/3 ​​ of his bucket. How many buckets will 1kg sand fill?
typo
2d
revised Caden has 4/3 kg of sand which fills 2/3 ​​ of his bucket. How many buckets will 1kg sand fill?
maybe the extra stuff is really unnecessary here?
2d
revised Caden has 4/3 kg of sand which fills 2/3 ​​ of his bucket. How many buckets will 1kg sand fill?
added 1147 characters in body
2d
revised Caden has 4/3 kg of sand which fills 2/3 ​​ of his bucket. How many buckets will 1kg sand fill?
added 1147 characters in body
2d
answered Caden has 4/3 kg of sand which fills 2/3 ​​ of his bucket. How many buckets will 1kg sand fill?
Apr
14
awarded  Yearling
Apr
9
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
8
comment In how many ways can five letters be posted in 4 boxes?
@StevePowell: The same way the OP did: mark 5 + 3 = 8 spots on a table, choose 3 of them to put dividers in, and fill the remaining 5 with letters. You now have 5 letters on the table, separated into 4 groups (some of which may be empty) by the 3 dividers. Proving that each choice of 3 spots for the dividers generates a distinct 4-tuple of group sizes, and that all 4-tuples summing up to 5 can be so generated, is a common exercise for an introductory combinatorics class.
Apr
4
comment Fastest way to meet, without communication, on a sphere?
@alexis: Just to clarify, the terms "north" and "south" are well defined on any rotating sphere: standing on the surface and facing in the direction of the rotation, north is to your left and south to your right. But, of course, without a prior agreement on which pole you should meet at, there's no obvious reason to prefer either pole over the other as a meeting place (and thus no reason to expect your friend to choose the same pole as you do).
Apr
4
revised Could this identity have an application?
fix spelling and grammar
Mar
30
revised I can't understand logical implication
this looks nicer with some space around the \land
Mar
29
answered In mod3, is 3 greater than, or less than 1?
Mar
29
comment In mod3, is 3 greater than, or less than 1?
Actually, you can have an asymmetric (and even trichotomous) relation $\prec$ on the integers modulo $n$ that satisfies $a+c \prec b+c \iff a \prec b$: one example, for odd $n$, would be $a \prec b$ $\iff$ $0 < (b-a) \bmod n < n/2$ (where $x \bmod n$ means the smallest non-negative integer congruent to $x$ modulo $n$). It's just that such a relation may not (and in fact, except for trivial cases when $n<3$, cannot) be transitive, so you cannot conclude $a<c$ from $a<b$ and $b<c$.
Mar
11
comment Where has this unusually imaginary number been sighted?
@user86418: They are, but it's more of a bug than a feature. I noticed it because I'm using SOUP, which includes a client-side fix for the definition leakage. Also, there are places (like review, or revision history) where answers may be shown without the question for context.
Mar
11
comment Is there a word similar to “iff” meaning “one and only one”?
Note that expressing "exactly one of $P$, $Q$ and $R$" as $(P\oplus Q\oplus R)\land\lnot(P\land Q\land R)$ does not generalize well to higher numbers of propositions; for, say, four propositions, it would look something like $(P\oplus Q\oplus R\oplus S)\land\lnot(P\land Q\land R)\land\lnot(P\land Q\land S)\land\lnot(P\land R\land S)\land\lnot(Q\land R\land S)$, which isn't nearly so convenient any more.
Mar
11
revised Where has this unusually imaginary number been sighted?
copy the definition of \d from the question, so that the answer also renders correctly on its own
Mar
8
comment Basic combinatorics question. Select two teams from boys and girls.
@barakmanos: I think you might've spoiled the test, though.
Mar
8
comment Solving a quintic function for zero
@tomasz: I'm sure Amzoti meant "complex" instead of "(purely) imaginary". It's a common enough (abuse of) terminology that I didn't even notice it before you drew attention to it. Indeed, the use of "imaginary number" to mean "complex number that is not purely real" goes back to Descartes himself, and is the reason why the term "purely imaginary number" exists.
Mar
2
revised Witt vector question
fix binomial notation, use display math