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1d
asked Infinitesimal multiplication
1d
answered How to get a number that is divisible by $n$ - without obviously seeing it?
Apr
15
awarded  Revival
Apr
14
accepted Uniform convergence of recursively defined function sequence
Apr
12
asked Möbius transformation that permutes roots of a cubic polynomial
Apr
8
awarded  Yearling
Apr
8
comment Are mathematical articles on Wikipedia reliable?
@user140943 I cannot point to current errors, because I would fix them. But for example, I remember that the formula in Stewart's theorem was wrong at some time.
Apr
7
comment Are mathematical articles on Wikipedia reliable?
But there are many errors in formulas, and even worse, pages for typical first/second year courses are often correct, but very bad. (No examples, obfuscating language, etc.) Beginners' courses have to be structured very well and wikipedia cannot do that.
Apr
7
comment Are mathematical articles on Wikipedia reliable?
I like to look up mathematics on wikipedia (and mathworld), but I usually either know the result or can easily check the correctness. And contrary to a book, I can correct all the errors forever.
Apr
7
comment Show that if n divides a single Fibonacci number., then it will divide infinitely many Fibonacci numbers.
@MarioCarneiro $(F_k,F_{k+1}) \mod n$ has to repeat eventually. Since it starts out with $F_0=0$, you get 0 again and again.
Apr
7
comment Show that if n divides a single Fibonacci number., then it will divide infinitely many Fibonacci numbers.
Actually, you can do better: Any $n$ divides infinitely many Fibonacci numbers.
Mar
24
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
23
comment Perimeter of the triangle
@bigli Yes, I corrected it.
Mar
23
revised Perimeter of the triangle
deleted 11 characters in body
Mar
23
answered Perimeter of the triangle
Mar
23
comment Perimeter of the triangle
Your formulas describe angle bisectors not medians.
Mar
22
comment Slope intercept equation where b is the point on x-axis?
It is correct, but you should take care not to call the number $b$ the point and of course, it does not work if $m=0$.
Feb
27
answered How does one show that two general numbers $n! + 1$ and $(n+1)! + 1$ are relatively prime?
Feb
26
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Proof of the product rule. Trick. Add and subtract the same term.
Feb
26
answered Can someone explain ideals to me?